Punk Night at The Brewery:

The Squawk enjoying some well-earned Yardley brothers beer after their set

The Squawk enjoying some well-earned Yardley brothers beer after their set

Defiant Scum leading a singalong of “Fuck you, I'm drunk,” with backing vocals from members from Say Mosquito and Two Finger Salute

Defiant Scum leading a singalong of “Fuck you, I'm drunk,” with backing vocals from members from Say Mosquito and Two Finger Salute

Hong Kong street punk and Yardley Brothers beer go together like... punk music and beer, really. We got some of Hong Kong's best punk bands together for one night of loud, loud, LOUD punk music.

The Bands:

BEERTOPIA 2016

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When the Yardley Brothers decide to do something, we go all out. Beertopia was our first major beer festival. Luke and Duncan were still putting the finishing touches on the Brewery (and still working their day jobs).

but we knew that thousands of thirsty craft beer fans who had never tried Yardley Brothers beer would be there, and we wanted them to know all about us, our beer, and what we believe in. So we decided to make as much noise as possible.

Literally.

We set up the Yardley Brothers stage, and got some of Hong Kong's best bands together for a night of local music.

It was loud. People definitely noticed.

 

 

And so did the judges, who awarded our Hong Kong Bastard Imperial IPA two prizes: Best IPA and Best of Show.

 

Not too bad for our first major festival.

 

Sunday At THE SHACK

People from at least 8 different countries, having simultaneous conversations in three languages.

Lots and lots of Lamma Island IPA and Hong Kong Bastard on tap.

Just another Sunday afternoon at the beer shack.

Of course, it's not every day you have an 86 year old Hong Kong WWII veteran drop in to share some tales. Especially one who doesn't speak a lick of English. Luckily, between 8 people we had 10+ languages between us, so with the help of a few multi-linguals, we managed to make it work. We ended up with stories being told in one language, and translated on the fly into the nearest common languages by helpful amateur translators, until everyone understood, like an especially challenging game of telephone.

The coolest and most unexpected thing we've enjoyed about running the beer shack is seeing how love of great craft beer transcends things like cultural boundaries, age, and language, and brings together disparate groups of people --who otherwise might never have met-- for fascinating conversations.